Adventure, Adventure Prep, Fellowship of the Wheel

On Losing an Adventurer

Photo by Amsterdamized

Recently I wrote that a total of 18 people have expressed interest in the Fellowship of the Wheel, of which about nine are serious. So what happened to the other nine?

A trip like this is a big commitment. I’ve always assumed that not everyone who threw their hat in the ring would actually show up. Taking a cue from my college activism days, I expected the “law of halves” to take effect: half of all interested would be serious, and half of those will follow through. In other words, if just five adventurers show up in the flesh I’ll be quite happy.

So I wasn’t surprised that a handful of people have bowed out so far, although I am surprised at the reasons why. I assumed that security would be the biggest source of attrition. Potential adventurers would start out enthusiastic, I imagined, but then balk as friends and family scared them with stories of mass graves in Mexico. (Speaking only for my own friends and family, who have overall been amazingly supportive, telling me these horror stories is an eerily popular activity.)

At least two group members have indeed reported warnings from friends when they announced their intention. But out of 18 people interested, only one has cancelled over safety concerns. And even in that individual’s case, the worries were more his wife’s than his own and it sounds like a busy work schedule was a bigger factor.

Another individual who dropped out had very different reasons:

  1. He doesn’t approve of a fundraiser to help defray group costs;
  2. He couldn’t understand why we’re taking “so long” (80 days) to bike across Mexico.

Both of these objections come down to personal preference. The Fellowship has a clear mission to make adventure accessible and to use that adventure as a chance to learn about ourselves and the world. Both the fundraiser and the slow pace are intentional choices to support that mission.

The fundraiser in particular helps reduce barriers to people who wish to come. The trip is already expensive: you need a plane or bus ticket, a decent amount of cycling equipment, and money for food and lodging on the road. The individual in question, an older adult with a lot of cycling experience, wrote that “I… would rather just pay my share,” instead of relying on contributions. And that’s a very reasonable preference. But not everyone is an experienced cyclist, and it’s easy to forget how costly it can be to a beginner. If I asked everyone to pay a $300 entrance fee I suspect we’d lose several of the younger and less experienced members of the group, and some people may never have expressed interest at all. That would go against the core mission of making adventure accessible.

Likewise with the length of the journey. Our 80 day trip includes three day rest stops every week or so, plus a week long break in Catemaco for Christmas and New Year’s. “The three day rest stops could be eliminated or reduced to one day,” our erstwhile companion wrote. “The 80 day trip could be reduced to 40.”

Again, this is a very reasonable preference. Some cyclists hit the road in order to challenge themselves athletically, to see how many miles they can log per day or how fast they can go. This competitive spirit is a huge motive in the cycling community and can be a lot of fun.

But it’s not our main goal. The breaks give us much more than physical rest—they give us a chance to learn from the towns we visit. Three days is time to see pyramids, to talk to locals, to try a regional dish, to tour a museum, or simply to explore the streets of a new place. These are the activities that make you think about yourself and your place in the world. They’re opportunities to make new friends, to learn about a people and to see things you would never notice rushing by. This is where a sense of adventure and exploration comes from.

I wasn’t the smallest bit offended by this adventurer’s reasons for dropping out. I was grateful he explained them. It made it clear that we want something different from our travels. And it was a good reminder that I should clarify expectation on pacing to each and every member of the group before we hit the road together. We’ll have both long, disciplined days on the road and slow, easy days of freeform exploring. The people who enjoy both are the ones who will be happiest with our Fellowship.

Please help us travel safely (and earn amazing rewards!) by contributing to the Fellowship of the Wheel today.

Standard
Adventure, Bicycling, Fellowship of the Wheel

My Growing Group of Nomads

Photo by ItzaFineDay

I’m amazed by the group of adventurers who’ve joined the Fellowship of the Wheel.

We have a Buddhist who bicycles every day. He keeps vegetarian, but said he isn’t too worried about lard in his beans and rice. And if it’s served with chicken, he told me, he’ll just pull out those bits and give them to someone who eats meat.

We have a webmaster who was already planning a ride across Mexico of his own. In the past he has driven dogsleds in Alaska and built earth houses in New Mexico. He was going to make the trip across Mexico solo but, like me, thought it would be more fun to go with a group.

We have a creative writing professor, a Quaker who studies international education, and a girlfriend/boyfriend duo who do their bicycling as a team.

There are more, but you get the idea. At first I was floored by the sheet number of people who responded to my call for adventurers—about 18 total, and roughly half of those are serious—but as I get to know them better I’m increasingly awed by the types of people they are. Not all have cycling experience, but all have some kind of adventurous spirit and have lived amazing, unusual experiences. Many are nomadic.

One trend in particular stands out. I asked the group members to take turns introducing themselves by email. One after another said the same thing: they sold or gave up their possessions so they could live a different life.

In many ways that’s the ultimate commitment for someone seeking a life outside the ordinary. Once you give up your belongings you are burning the ship that brought you from a traditional life to one filled with adventure. I remember the freeing feeling during the summer I gave up my things. I rarely think of the belongings I once had, which held me back from traveling, and when I do it’s with a sense of relief.

Needless to say, I’m excited to meet each of these adventurers in person. Once we hit the road together I will introduce them here on Rogue Priest, but more importantly I’ll also ask them to start blogs of their own and report their own experiences. It’s good to have a multiplicity of perspectives.

Meanwhile, you can help us make this trip a safe one by making a contribution. In exchange you get access to video logs of the journey, stories about the places we visit and even get postcards sent from the road. Please contribute to the Fellowship of the Wheel today.

Do you have questions about the people I’ve recruited, how I recruited them, or how I went about screening them? Leave a comment below. What do you think of the group so far?

Standard
Adventure, Adventure Prep, Andre Sólo, Fellowship of the Wheel

It Felt Like Chickening Out

Photo by Mish Sukharev

When I was in Guanajuato I almost gave up on my Adventure. I didn’t know if I wanted to go on and bike across Mexico, because I felt lonely and overwhelmed making such a big journey on my own. But I didn’t want to give up, either. I felt lost and confused.

I wrote to a friend for help. This is what I wrote:

I still want to bicycle across Mexico and Latin America, the more I read about other people doing it the more amazing it sounds. But they always go with a partner, a spouse, a buddy or a group… it would be nice to share the experience with other people.

I’m considering putting the adventure on hold to try to form a group. It would be so much more fun. It would also be safer. Not that we can ever say it is 100% safe but it makes such a difference when you have people looking out for each other.

But this makes me feel really conflicted. It feels like ANOTHER delay in the Adventure and also kind of like chickening out. Like I’ve already delayed the Mexico leg for a year, am I going to do it or not? I don’t want to sit around making excuses not to go and regretting it later.

My friend wrote back to me:

It’s your adventure, so you must choose your own path. I would suggest not thinking about it too much. Make a decision, stick to it. That’s the best anyone can hope for.

I have traveled alone and I know well the anguish of doing so. It also feels very pointless with no witness. But I’ve come out the other end, with very little memory of it, and so I know little of what was gained. I know that I have lost much on those trips.  But I wouldn’t change it. Either way.

It’s a tough decision, Andre, but one that you are more than capable of making. Delay means nothing. You are still young and have the luxury of time. It takes nothing away from the journey to change tactics. Any veteran understands the necessity of wisdom. Patience is key, and it matters not at all how long the journey takes you.

You are beholden only to your own impatience. No one else’s judgment matters in the least. Take your time, gather your resources, and enjoy the journey as best you can. You have already seen what traveling alone in Mexico is like.  If you don’t like it, don’t fucking do it, man! Screw that!

I would lean toward finding a human to share the trip with. Because it seems that is what you are doing anyway. And there is no shame in that anyway.

Those words cured me instantly. Right away I knew he was right. I asked another friend for help planning it, and today we have a group of at least 10 people planning to ride across Mexico together. I’ve never been more excited about the Adventure.

The moral of the story isn’t exactly “it’s okay to chicken out.” It might be make sure your actions align with your dream. 

What is your dream? Do your actions align with it? And, if not, what’s holding you back?

You can help us launch the trip across Mexico with a contribution. In exchange, you’ll be with us every step of the way with video logs, stories from the road, postcards and letters. Please consider contributing and help us spread the word: The Fellowship of the Wheel campaign. Thank you!

Standard
Adventure, Fellowship of the Wheel, Spotlight

In a World of Cynics and Fiends

Photo by S. Tarr

Photo by S. Tarr

“I know it’s not easy to follow our dreams in this world of cynics and fiends, forgotten hopes and purpose left unanswered, left unredeemed, but we must strive for it still, and on the way we will find others who travel alongside us as they too reach out towards their own hopes and dreams.”

This splendid little note was sent to me by adventurer S. Tarr after he contributed to Fellowship of the Wheel crowdfunding campaign.

Perhaps you’d like to contribute, too?

Standard
Adventure, Adventure Prep, Bicycling, Fellowship of the Wheel, Mexico

Update on the Fellowship of the Wheel

Funding update for Andre's trip across Mexico

Adventuring means traveling freely. But it does not mean traveling for free.

That’s why I created the Fellowship of the Wheel crowdfunding campaign, which is currently live on Indiegogo. This campaign is designed to support the Fellowship’s ride across Mexico, my first major group ride. I announced the campaign a week ago and it’s time for an update on progress.

First let me say how impressed I am with the group of adventurers planning on crossing Mexico with me. We have about 14 people interested in going, which is more than I ever could have hoped for. Some want to go for the whole thing, others only for a leg. But it’s not the sheer number of people that amazes me, it’s the mix that we have.

Our group includes both men and women, skewed a bit toward the male side of the spectrum. There are people of all ages, from 20’s to 60’s. And their experience level varies widely, from people trying a long bicycle ride for the first time to experienced touring cyclists/bicycle mechanics. Basically, it’s everything I could have asked for.

One man, in his early 60’s, emailed me just today to ask if he could come along. “I haven’t toured long/overnight on bicycle,” he wrote. “I am a beginner. I ride everyday in Vermont and I find the hills difficult.” Even so, he wants to cross 2,000 miles of uncertain terrain.

This is exactly why I launched the Fellowship in the first place. To me, an adventure is an undertaking so big that at first you don’t have the skills you need to complete it. You have to improve yourself along the way. I have no doubt that all of us who attempt this ride will rise to the occasion.

Right now, we have raised only 25% of the funds we need. This money will help us afford safety equipment and resources. I’m asking all of you reading this to please click this link and consider donating. And whether you donate or not, please share the link as widely as you can.

All support is appreciated. You are making dreams come true.

Standard
Adventure Prep, Fellowship of the Wheel, Spotlight

Help Us Launch the Fellowship of the Wheel

Fellowship of the Wheel bicycle

I’ve never been a whiz with videos. I can write, I can draw, I can even kind of sing—but shooting and editing videos is just not something I grew up doing. That’s why I’m particularly proud of the one I just shot for the Fellowship of the Wheel funding campaign. Once it was edited and live, I sent it to a few friends to get their reaction, and the consensus was “it’s cute!” (That’s a lot better than the consensus for my last video, which was “you need a better microphone.”)

This campaign aims to raise at least $1,200 to cover costs such as a support vehicle in the border region, a portable wi-fi device and more pre-adventure training. The goal is to keep us safe and keep our risks to a minimum.

Many thanks to all of you over the past week as I planned the campaign; your comments on the prospective rewards, both here on the site and privately, have been immensely helpful. I made a few small changes to the rewards list and I believe we’re offering some very gratifying perks to contributors. The goal with almost all of them is to help our supporters feel closer to the Adventure and participate in it from home.

I hope you’ll take a look at the campaign, check out my attempt at a video, and consider throwing your support behind us as we gear up. And, of course, please share the campaign link with as many people as possible to help increase awareness. Click here to take a look.

Thank you!

 

Standard
Adventure Prep, Fellowship of the Wheel

What Do You Think of These Rewards?

Yesterday I asked for help choosing rewards for a Fellowship of the Wheel crowdfunding campaign. The funds we raise will help defray group expenses, like a support vehicle that will help us stay safe in the riskiest leg of the adventure.

After a lot of thought and many good suggestions, I have a draft list of rewards. What do you think?

$1 – Moving Thank You

Your name is inscribed in a booklet and carried across Mexico, traveling with me on my bike! I will say “thank you” over it every day. (Okay, I might forget some days, but it will definitely be a lot of thank yous.) It’s almost like you make the whole journey with us, but with less sweat.

$15 – Behind the Scenes

You get the Moving Thank You PLUS you receive exclusive access to a weekly video log, posted at every rest stop (10 videos total). You will see firsthand our triumphs and challenges every step of the way.

$25 – Story Collection

The Moving Thank You and Behind the Scenes PLUS you receive advanced supporters-only digital copies of four short stories written during the journey, inspired by the places we visit and the people we meet. These stories will bear my signature “magical realism” style and tell the tales of the secret places of Mexico.

$35 – Post Card

What is better than a handwritten postcard from a wanderer in a faraway land? You get the Moving Thank You AND I will send you one post card from Mexico, in my own sloppy but adorable handwriting.

$50 – Take Me With You!

You get EVERYTHING ABOVE! One post card, all the stories, all the video logs, and we carry your name across a nation. Stop stalking us!!

$50 – Blessings to the Wind

Moving Thank You PLUS name the person or cause you want blessed. I will perform two offerings for you: one to the sky gods at the famous pyramid of Chichén Itzá, and one to the chthonic gods at the underground river (cenote) beneath Valladolid. I reserve veto power so don’t ask me to pray for Hitler!

$75 – Moar Adventure

You just can’t get enough, can you? You get EVERYTHING above, the post card, the stories, the videos, your name carried 2000 miles, AND I make offerings for the cause of your choice at two of the spiritual wonders of the world. Are you satisfied yet??

$100 – Pen Pal

You get MOAR ADVENTURE and I will send you a full handwritten letter in addition to the postcard. I don’t write chit-chat, it will be good. It will be at least one page long and likely several, as I write until my poor millennial hand cramps up.

$150 – Autographed, Inscribed Adventuring Shirt

This is THE t-shirt I wore every day while I cycled all 1,800 miles of the Mississippi River, from the source to the Gulf. It’s an irreplaceable World Domination Summit shirt from the first ever WDS. At that conference I told the camera I was going to live my dream by bicycling the Mississippi River, then I put on that shirt and did it. This shirt is faded, stained, worn down and was with me every minute.

I have hand inscribed the shirt with an adventure quote in gold ink, and will autograph it for you. It will arrive framed and ready to hang (or wear). Plus, you get everything in Moar Adventure.

Me setting off in the t-shirt in question. Photo by my mom!

Me setting off in the t-shirt in question. Photo by my mom!

$150 – Autographed, Inscribed Adventuring Shirt (Texas Edition)

After I did the Mississippi, I turned west toward Texas and the Mexico border. This time my cycling shirt was a custom-made Rogue Priest baseball tee, with long sleeves to protect from the sun. You will be the proud owner of THAT SHIRT! The night that I crossed a train bridge and had to race a speeding train, I wrote this shirt. You can still smell the fear maybe.

This will arrived hand inscribed with a different adventure quote in gold ink, autographed for you, and framed for display (or ready to wear). Plus everything in Moar Adventure!

$200 – Digital BFF

You get everything in Moar Adventure PLUS I will video call you from the road. This is not a quick hello call, this is a one hour video call (or two half hours, your preference) from the road on the ride across Mexico (I mean, I will be sitting down, not actually ON the bike… you get the idea). We can talk about anything you want or I can just tell you the latest crazy misadventures. What is it like talking to someone in the field on a real adventure? This is your chance to find out!

$250 – Vodou

Did you know we practice Vodou in New Orleans? You get everything in Moar Adventure PLUS I will send you a hand painted, ritually blessed piece of Vodou (voodoo) artwork. I paint veve’s, which are ritual symbols used to invoke the spirits of Vodou. You will receive one 10 x 13″ veve on handmade paper loaded with good juju. You can pick the spirit or I can let the spirits choose. I will prep this veve for “activation” to bring the spirit into your life, or just leave it as a nice piece of art. Your call!

$500 – Masterpiece Vodou

Everything in Moar Adventure PLUS one full size Vodou veve painting on canvas. This will be a layered, splattered, energetic piece of artwork in bright Creole colors. You can choose the spirit or I will ask them for you, and I can ritually prep it for “activation” if you want to bring the spirit into your life. Would fit perfectly over a home shrine or just use it as a one of a kind piece of artwork, painted by a real New Orleans Vodou initiate (that’s me).

$1000 – Personal Adventure

Wanna have an adventure, but don’t want to bicycle across Latin America? Come to the most Latin city in the US and let me be your guide. You get everything in Moar Adventure, plus I will be your personal tour guide for a full day and evening of exploring New Orleans. We can bike it, walk it, streetcar it or drive it… and I will tailor the adventure to your tastes. I can show you a hidden boardwalk through a silent bayou where I guarantee you’ll see alligators. Or we can explore beautiful bars, great restaurants and unforgettable music. We can even coordinate it so you can attend a real Vodou ceremony at a local temple.

You pay your own travel costs, and I will make sure you see a side of New Orleans most visitors never see.

Please leave a comment and tell me what you think of these rewards. In particular I wonder two things: which of these rewards do you like the most? And do the dollar amounts seem right for them?

Your comments will help me make the strongest list of rewards possible, so I hope you’ll take a moment to share your thoughts. What do you think?

Standard
Adventure Prep, Fellowship of the Wheel

Bringing the Fellowship to Life

“I’m really excited about the prospect of exploring Mexico, rediscovering biking, meeting new people and doing some good thinking and talking and breathing.”

That’s a comment from one of my potential co-adventurers for the Fellowship of the Wheel. I’ve spent pretty much all my waking time over the last two weeks working on, thinking about, or promoting the Fellowship—and it seems to be paying off.

We have a small roster of interested folks now. Pixi, whom you may remember from the Texas ride, signed up from the beginning; she’ll be doing at least the first leg with me and as many more legs as possible. Then I got word from two personal friends of mine, separately, who are both interested in the last leg or two of the trip. And just in the past 24 hours I’ve had four (!) total strangers contact me declaring their interest.

This is exciting.

Photo by Lili Vieira de Carvalho

Meanwhile I’m working on logistics. Joining us on the Fellowship is completely free (you pay your own travel costs), but there are expenses I’ll need to cover. That has me considering a Kickstarter campaign so that I don’t have to pay entirely out of pocket. These expenses include:

  • Support car. During the first three days, I’m planning to have a support vehicle tail us. That way if we have a mechanical problem we can get a ride to town before dark. $300.
  • Fuel. $350.
  • Wi-fi. During our break days I will be catching up with clients and working, which requires wi-fi. Although internet is pretty ubiquitous in Mexico, I don’t like to take chances. I plan to invest in a portable wi-fi device, likely a dongle from local carrier Telcel. $100.
  • Data plan. $200.
  • Training & education. It’s been suggested to me that now would be a good time to take classes on bicycling safety and bike repair. The more knowledge I have once we’re on the road, the better. $250.

That’s a total of $1200 to crowdfund. Is that doable? I’d like to think it is, but I’d love your suggestions about what kinds of rewards to offer. The ideal Kickstarter rewards are things that aren’t physical, so that there’s little cost involved in delivering them: perhaps exclusive access to a video log of the journey, for instance. I was also thinking postcards from Mexico would be a good reward, and at higher levels we could do physical things as well. But those are just some basic ideas. What would you like to see as a reward for people who support the Fellowship?

Standard